Play List:

1. The Rath Boys

2. The Witchfinder

3. A Madcap Prince

4. Corinne

5. The Queen of Connaught

6. The Nine Days’ Queen

7. The Mormons

8. The Shadow of the Sword

9. Lucy Brandon

10. Storm-Beaten

11. Lady Clare

[Flowers of the Forest]

12. A Sailor and His Lass

13. Bachelors

14. Constance

15. Lottie

16. Agnes

17. Alone in London

18. Sophia

19. Fascination

20. The Blue Bells of Scotland

21. Partners

22. Joseph’s Sweetheart

23. That Doctor Cupid

24. Angelina!

25. The Old Home

26. A Man’s Shadow

27. Theodora

28. Man and the Woman

29. Clarissa

30. Miss Tomboy

31. The Bride of Love

32. Sweet Nancy

33. The English Rose

34. The Struggle for Life

35. The Sixth Commandment

36. Marmion

37. The Gifted Lady

38. The Trumpet Call

39. Squire Kate

40. The White Rose

41. The Lights of Home

42. The Black Domino

43. The Piper of Hamelin

44. The Charlatan

45. Dick Sheridan

46. A Society Butterfly

47. Lady Gladys

48. The Strange Adventures of Miss Brown

49. The Romance of the Shopwalker

50. The Wanderer from Venus

51. The Mariners of England

52. Two Little Maids from School

53. When Knights Were Bold

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Short Plays

Other Plays

Buchanan’s Theatrical Ventures in America

Poetry Readings

ROBERT WILLIAMS BUCHANAN (1841 - 1901)

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ROBERT BUCHANAN’S SHORT PLAYS

 

These are one-act dramas which were designed as curtain-raisers, to be performed prior to the main play.

1. Only A Vagabond

2. A Dark Night’s Bridal

3. The Night Watch

 

1. Only A Vagabond (1881)

 

Loosely based on Buchanan’s poem, ‘Attorney Sneak’ (published in London Poems, 1866), which was presented as an opener for The Nine Days’ Queen and Lady Clare.

 

The Graphic (19 February, 1881)

     Mr. Robert Buchanan’s historical drama, The Nine Days’ Queen, of which we gave some account on the occasion of its recent production at a matinée at the Gaiety, has been reproduced at the ROYAL CONNAUGHT Theatre. Miss Harriet Jay, the author of that clever novel, “The Queen of Connaught,” again sustains the character of the heroine. By way of introduction to the evening’s entertainment the management have produced a comic drama in two acts, entitled Only a Vagabond, founded on one of Mr. Robert Buchanan’s “London Poems.” The story of this little piece is somewhat extravagant. It represents a solicitor of position conspiring with his father, who is a tramp and a mendicant, to coerce a young lady into a marriage, while concealing from her the circumstance that she is an heiress under a will, which is to be fraudulently hidden for the purpose. The old tramp proves a marplot; and finally, his sympathies being aroused by the young lady’s appeal to his generosity, he declines to be a party to the deception, and assists in exposing the nefarious scheme. The moral seems to be that a generous ne’er-do-weel is morally superior to a smug solicitor of crafty and designing habits; but this is a thesis hardly worth maintaining in two acts. The story, such as it is, however, is skilfully set forth, and the dialogues and incidents amuse the audience; though Mr. Wood plays the part of the father with annoying exaggeration; and the representative of the young heroine is too manifestly a manifest novice. The best piece of acting in the play is Mr. Beaumont’s performance of the part of the wicked solicitor.

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The Era (19 February, 1881)

CONNAUGHT THEATRE.

     Mr Robert Buchanan’s historical play A Nine Days’ Queen, recently produced at the Gaiety, and fully noticed in these columns, has now taken the place of La Fille du Tambour Major here, and seems likely to attract considerable attention, and to win deserved favour. Miss Harriet Jay resumes her original character as Lady Jane Grey, and is well supported by Mr F. H. Macklin as Lord Dudley, Mr H. St. Maur as Earl of Hertford, and other competent artists. The drama is preceded by a two-act piece called Only a Vagabond, also from the pen of Mr Buchanan. It is not very original, but it is thoroughly interesting; and, having in Mr Arthur Wood a most competent exponent of the most prominent and most important part, it should command success. The part referred to is that of Elijah Sleek, a man who returns to England from America very poor and very shabby, and, in a word, a vagabond. Elijah has a son—a highly respectable son—Thomas, who is by no means proud of him. Indeed, he has given him money to keep at a distance. He has, however, returned, and Thomas must put up with him as best he can. Soon the vagabond father becomes the instrument for the frustrating of the rascally scheme of the son. He is once more disgusted with respectability, and back he goes to his wandering, shiftless, vagabond life. Mr Wood’s acting throughout is admirable, and he gets good support at the hands of Messrs Beaumont (as the son Thomas), Bauer, and Bindloss; and Misses Letty Lind, and Clifton.

 

Back to the Bibliography or the Plays

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2. A Dark Night’s Bridal (1887)

 

Based on a story by Robert Louis Stevenson, presented as an opener for Sophia.

 

Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper (10 April, 1887)

VAUDEVILLE.

     Mr. Robert Buchanan’s new one-act poetical comedy, called A Dark Night’s Bridal, is a far-fetched, romantic little piece that is not long enough to be tedious, but fails to interest to any extent, for the reason that the issue can be perceived almost from the outset. An aged old tyrant living in the Middle Ages mistakes a knight who has sought shelter in his castle from a storm for a particularly ardent lover of his niece. The Sire de Chassaloup refuses to listen to any explanation, and offers him the hand of the lady or a noose, giving him half an hour to decide. The thought of being married on compulsion is at first repellant to both the young people, but in a short time they grow fond of each other and proceed to their bridal as the curtain falls. The dialogue is the best feature of the flimsy trifle, which is avowedly founded on a prose sketch by Mr. R. L. Stevenson. The piece was ably acted by Miss Kate Rorke and Messrs. Fuller Mellish and Royce Carleton; but the attitude of the audience was rather that of graceful toleration than of satisfaction.

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The Times (11 April, 1887 - p.8)

     As a lever de rideau to Sophia there was produced at the Vaudeville on Saturday night a short one act piece in blank verse by Mr. Robert Buchanan, called A Dark Night’s Bridal. For the story of this the author confesses himself indebted to a “prose sketch” by Mr. R. L. Stevenson. The acknowledgment is well-meant, but, unfortunately, it associates a probably innocent writer with a very incoherent, not to say nonsensical, piece of work. The scene is laid at the Castle Chasseloup, in Burgundy in the 15th century, and the personages are three—Le Sire de Chasseloup (who is nameless), his niece Blanche, and a casual visitor, Henri de St. Valery. Le Sire de Chasseloup has intercepted some amorous correspondence between his niece and a certain captain of archers, who, it appears, has arranged a secret meeting with the young lady. As luck has it, Henri de St. Valery, a total stranger to the household, enters the castle about the time appointed for the rendezvous to seek shelter from a storm, and is mistaken by the irate châtelain for his niece’s lover. Explanations and protests are unavailing; Blanche’s uncle has resolved that she shall wed the intruder then and there, an altar and a priest being provided for the occasion, and the visitor is given a quarter of an hour to decide whether he shall marry the young lady or be hanged. After some haggling, the match is agreed upon and the curtain falls. There is not a glimmer of truth or common sense in the story, the absurdity of which, as here told, is accentuated by the conscientious and careful acting of Mr. Royce Carleton as the châtelain, and Miss Kate Rorke and Mr. Fuller Mellish as the lovers.

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The Morning Post (11 April, 1887 - p.6)

VAUDEVILLE THEATRE.
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     For the working out of his new poetical comedy “A Dark Night’s Bridal,” Mr. Robert Buchanan goes back to the  so-called good old times when bold barons who lived in castles surrounded by men-at-arms made their own laws, and did what seemed good in their own eyes. The scene is laid in a room in the Castle of Le Sire de Chasseloup—a gloomy, vaulted chamber, with a groined recess hidden by hangings. The storm is raging without, the snow falling, and it is nearly midnight. Chasseloup enters and summons one of the guards to give him instructions as to the gates being left open for any one to enter, but no one is to depart. He then has an interview with a priest. The audience see that an altar is behind the hangings and Chasseloup, the grey-bearded owner of the castle, after an allusion to a mousetrap, goes behind the hangings, for steps are heard without. The next minute Henri de St. Valéry, a handsome young gallant in whitened cloak, but whose showy bravery and ostrich feather seem rather to have come out of a glass case than a snowstorm, enters to announce that he had lost his way, found the doors open, and entered to take refuge from the terrible storm, and rejoicing in lights and the fire burning, he proceeds to make himself comfortable. His reveries, however, are interrupted by Chasseloup, who mockingly bids him welcome, tells him he was expected, and that everything is prepared. The Knight disclaims all knowledge of the owner of the castle, and tells his story of missing his way, but it is jeered at by Chasseloup, who calls him his dear nephew, and after informing him that he is to be married that night or else be hung, goes to the hangings and brings forth his niece, Blanche. In the scene which follows the lady declares she has never seen the Knight before, the Knight endorses her statement, but the old man derisively discredits all they say; tells the Knight that matters have gone far enough for the honour of his name, and persists with his intention of hanging his guest if, in a quarter of an hour, he does not consent to marry the beautiful niece. He then leaves the young couple together, and the lady confesses that a young Captain of Archers has been in the habit of writing to her; that after a time he once forced his way to her presence there, and threw himself at her feet, that he was seen and betrayed to the lady’s uncle, and that after a time, when he wrote saying that he should come and see her that night, the uncle had set a trap for him baited with the fair lady’s person, into which Henri de St. Valéry had unwittingly walked. The gentleman had previously tried to escape, but found the door guarded by armed men, and he had drawn his sword to attack Chasseloup to find two more armed men start out and present their arquebuses in a fashion wonderfully similar to the way in which Richelieu is defended from the attack of De Mauprat. And now that the young couple are left together for fifteen minutes’ reflection an amusing scene follows. Neither will marry for pity or for coercion, but by degrees matters follow the course exactly as they did in the old ballad of the knight and the lady who met in the grove. There is a great deal of Romeo and Juliet business, which is prenuptual and not so excusable as in the Shakespearean play, though the Knight pleads that the caresses he asks are a dying man’s requests. Finally, the lady confesses that Henri is far handsomer and more knightly than the archer captain, and the matrimonial is preferred to the hempen noose, the curtain falling just as the priest is ready to perform the ceremony of “A Dark Night’s Bridal.” The piece is founded on one of Mr. Robert Louis Stevenson’s mediæval sketches; and if poetical is made less so by the awkward manner in which Mr. Fuller Mellish delivered his lines. He was all that was manly and attractive-looking, and acted well, as did Mr. Royce Carleton as the Old Sire, but his delivery might be rather improved. The striking part of the piece was the extremely intelligent delineation of the character of the old tyrant’s niece. In this Miss Kate Rorke gave another example of her ready powers of adaptation, inasmuch as she raised what would have otherwise been very commonplace to a point of interest, which fell when she was not to the fore. The piece was greeted with some applause, but its reception was on the whole cold, and the public verdict must be endorsed.

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The Athenæum (16 April, 1887 - No. 3103, p.521)

     ‘A DARK NIGHT’S BRIDAL,’ by Mr. Robert Buchanan, produced last Saturday at the Vaudeville, is a dramatic version of a fantasy by Mr. Robert Louis Stevenson, in which a man entering a château as a stranger in mediæval times finds himself compelled to choose between marriage with an unknown lady and death. Little of the quaintness of the original conception is retained in the dramatic version, nor is the acting suited to the piece. Miss Kate Rorke as the heroine, Mr. Fuller Mellish as the hero, and Mr. Royce Carleton as the tyrannical old uncle, by whose arbitrary decision marriage is forced upon two reluctant young people, played the whole in a style too modern and realistic.

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The Theatre (1 May, 1887)

     A new poetical comedy, in one act, entitled “A Dark Night’s Bridal,” founded by Robert Buchanan on a story of R. L. Stevenson’s in “The New Arabian Nights,” was produced at the Vaudeville on 9th April. Henri de St. Valery, a young soldier, drawn in the romantic lines of mediævalism, finds himself overtaken by a storm in the neighbourhood of an old Burgundian castle, and seeks shelter there. The owner of the castle. Sire de Chasseloup, mistakes his guest for a lover of his niece, and very angrily demands that St. Valery shall marry the lady immediately, or submit to the ignominious process of strangulation. As only one course can be adopted, a lovemaking consequently ensues, at first of a rather stormy character, but ultimately maturing into a placid acceptance of the old sire’s requirements. As a book for the study, Mr. Buchanan’s little comedy would be most acceptable, but it seems rather out of place upon the stage. Miss Kate Rorke played the wayward Blanche in pretty, mock-coquettish manner. The Sire de Chasseloup of Mr. Royce Carleton was a somewhat stiff performance, and Mr. Wheatman and Mr. Fuller Mellish did not achieve any considerable measure of success.

 

Back to the Bibliography or the Plays

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3. The Night Watch

 

First produced after Buchanan’s death at a benefit for the Buchanan Memorial Fund in April, 1902.

 

The Stage (10 April, 1902 - p.10)

     SOUTHEND—EMPIRE.—The Southend Dramatic Society on Tuesday night gave a performance in aid of the Fund to provide a Permanent Memorial to the late Robert Buchanan, who had resided at Southend for a long period, and now rests in “God’s little acre by the sea,” beneath the sheltering wall of the Church of St. John. The local society decided to give performances on two nights—Tuesday and Wednesday—in aid of the Memorial Fund, and for such an occasion could not have presented a more attractive programme. Indeed, the curtain raiser was produced for the first time by permission of the author’s sister-in-law, Miss Harriett Jay. This was a poetical drama in one act, by Robert Buchanan, entitled:—

The Night Watch.

Heinrich von Auerbach . . . . Mr. Reginald Sewell
Vicomte de Lisle . . . . . . . . Mr. J. K. F. Picken
Hubert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. G. W. Taylor
Dr. Marton . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Reveirs-Hopkins
Irene de Grandfief . . . . . . . Mrs. Reveirs-Hopkins

This drama was admirably acted by a quintet of well-known amateurs; but it was not a cheerful opening for an evening’s entertainment. It was tragedy, as a contrast to the comedy to follow. Mrs. Reveirs-Hopkins cleverly interpreted the character of Irene de Grandfief, and Mr. Reginald Sewell appeared as Heinrich von Auerbach, who is supposed to have witnessed the death of the Vicomte de Lisle, to whom Irene is betrothed, and who, by a freak of fortune, is brought wounded to the chateau of which Irene is mistress. The participation of Heinrich in the events which led to the supposed death of her lover leads Irene to be tempted to allow Heinrich to die by neglect, but her better feelings hold sway, and as the curtain falls her lover returns well, and the scene closes with the usual conquest of meaner feelings with virtue triumphant. Buchanan’s Sweet Nancy was the chief feature of the programme. Mrs. Reveirs-Hopkins decidedly scored a success as an amateur in the part of Nancy; Mrs. Cardy Bluck made a charming Barbara, and the other sister, Teresa, became an admirable juvenile part in the hands of Miss Dora Seal. Mr. William Gray looked the character as Sir Roger Tempest, and acted admirably. Mr. Donald Gray was a very fair Frank Musgrave.

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Essex County Chronicle (11 April, 1902 - p.5)

     THE SOUTHEND DRAMATIC SOCIETY on Tuesday and Wednesday gave a performance in aid of the fund to provide a permanent memorial to the late Mr. Robert Buchanan, who resided at Southend for a long period, and is buried in St. John’s Churchyard. The curtain raiser, “The Night Watch,” by Robert Buchanan, was produced for the first time, by permission of the author’s sister-in-law, Miss Harriett Jay. Mrs. Reveirs-Hopkins cleverly interpreted the character of Irene de Grandfief, and Mr. Reginald Sewell appeared as Heinrich von Auerbach. Buchanan’s “Sweet Nancy” was the chief feature of the programme; and here Mrs. Hopkins scored a decided success in the title rôle. Mrs. Cardy Bluck made a charming Barbara, and the other sister, Teresa, was capably impersonated by Miss Dora Seel. Mr. William Gray did well as Sir Roger Tempest, Mr. Donald Gray as Frank Musgrave, and altogether the performance was one of merit.

 

Back to the Bibliography or the Plays

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Next: Robert Buchanan’s Other (unproduced) Plays

Back to the Bibliography or the Plays

 

Home
Biography
Bibliography

 

Poetry
Plays
Fiction

 

Essays
Reviews
Letters

 

The Fleshly School Controversy
Buchanan and the Press
Buchanan and the Law

 

The Critical Response
Harriett Jay
Miscellanea

 

Links
Site Diary
Site Search